Challenges and Progress in Africa

An RC workshop took place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, June 14 to 16, 2013. It was composed of participants with special needs, and others. Mesfin Taye Woldegiorgis, the Area Reference Person for Addis Ababa, had chosen a facility that was accessible to people with wheelchairs. Many of the participants had taught RC classes.

Among other introductory activities, people shared what they understood about RC theory and practice. When I lead RC in various parts of Africa, I find that sometimes a particular Community will define the theory and practice in a way that makes sense to their particular group without necessarily diluting the theory and practice.

Mesfin’s group has used RC theory and practice to address the oppression of people with special needs—for example, the lack of accessibility, the discrimination in employment, and the oppressive language used to describe people with special needs. They have challenged the system to be inclusive and have held forums to raise awareness. I was touched by their determination to connect with RC and the rest of the world. They have done a lot of work. I am trying to put people who lead this work in touch with each other so that they can share information.

I will be in Rwanda in August and intend to conduct a workshop that includes people from Rwanda, Burundi, and Congo. I encourage leaders from developed RC Communities to reach out to African leaders, check on how they are doing, and give them a hand.*

On this continent, multiple issues consume our minds and divert our attention. This is why I personally embrace RC theory and practice. It can play a significant role in addressing such challenges. We are grateful for the support that has made our progress as a Community possible.

Wanjiku Kironyo
Regional Reference Person
for Northern Africa
Nairobi, Kenya


* “A hand” means some help.


Last modified: 2016-08-22 02:11:22-07