K.1. Internet Security

Each Co-Counselor who uses the Internet should start thinking, acting, and discharging about Internet security. Creating real Internet security in our Community depends on everyone in the Community doing this work. 

Any time RCers send documents (including workshop rosters, databases, and spreadsheets) that include Co-Counselors’ telephone numbers, identities, or confidential information, the documents must be password-protected. The password must be sent by a separate e-mail or by other means. Documents containing information about groups of Co-Counselors should not include anyone’s physical address unless there is no other means of contacting that Co-Counselor and that individual has given permission to provide the address.

E-mails to groups of more than fifteen (15) Co-Counselors should have the recipients’ e-mail addresses in the Blind Carbon Copy (BCC) field. If discussion among the recipients is necessary, contact information should be included in a password-protected document. Co-Counselors may also text or create closed social media groups for discussion purposes (see Guideline M.3., Electronic Communications) and are encouraged to use encrypted applications.

RCers should not use Internet sites other than the RC Community website to compile and organize such information.[89]

REASON

The Internet makes efficient communication and organization possible. However, its users are increasingly vulnerable to privacy infringement. Internet services collect personal data through automated processes. This data includes the connections between members of the group and the connection between the members and the group. They also collect information on RC. They then use it for their own often exploitative purposes.

Internet security depends not only on technology but also on where data is kept and who can access it. The RC Community website is being made as secure as possible. It will be a good tool for RC Community organizing. No website is completely secure. However, the RC Community website is much more secure than free or commercial Internet services. (See Guideline M.3., Electronic Communications.)

We password-protect our documents to encrypt them and prevent the data in them from being collected and abused. Encryption makes unauthorized reading unlikely because too much work is required to decrypt them. Using BCC is one way to stop spreading information beyond our own e-mail service. The more we use BCC the better it will protect us.


[89] Contact <ircc@rc.org> for information about organizing workshops using the RC website.


Last modified: 2019-05-02 14:41:35+00